Portal Path


Taken the other day around a local park. It seems that everything is blooming already. I just love pathways, portals, trails, bridges, and old barns. They are so expressive. They just speak to me of past generations, of others who came before and who left their footprints for us to follow.
It is how we best learn. Not by trying to reinvent the wheel but by standing on the shoulders of those who have gone before. Not by striking out on our own but by attending a class and learning as a group the time tested methods that work. After we have learned, we then go  off and create new things to pass on to the next generation.  It is the way of learning.
You can partake of this learning by using the signup form in the right sidebar of this blog. New classes are starting the week of May 7th.
I hope to see you in class. 

Farm Yard Feline

Some times, when you are out working, things just come together for a good image.
We were out doing some autumn portraits for a class demonstration and came upon this shaft of sunlight falling right on the old plow.  After setting up the camera for the  “Plow Photo”  this autumn colored feline walked out from behind the tree and stopped to take a good look at us.  We, of course reciprocated.  “That’s it kitty, a big smile”  :-)

Shadow Solution

This walkway over what the locals call “Hawg Creek” is part of a bike path that runs along the river in Lima.  It is nice to see the old rail road tracks being used for the betterment of the community. The “Rails to Trails” program is a big thing here in Xenia
and across the state.
You can now travel all over the state of Ohio by bicycle on these trails. A really cool concept.
Late afternoon light and a bit of imagination  produced this image.    Enjoy!

Snowy Lane

With all the snow we received yesterday (6″+), I decided to take a walk. It turned out to be about two miles and several photos. Really very pretty, but at 6* cold enough to hurt after a while. This is one of the side roads that I crossed at dusk.  Enjoy and stay warm.


To purchase a print of this image



A Return To Amish Area

— Fantastic Fall —

I have finally gotten enough time to start
processing the images taken over the last 6 weeks.
Fall is one of my busiest times of the year.
Usually a large exhibit, several shows, and always
the travel. On the road 4 weeks out of six,
with stops at home just
long enough to sleep in a good bed and get clean clothes.

So, now that the leaves are down….I need to get to work.
Sorting and processing several thousand images.
I sort of wish that I was back out there:
with camera in hand, the smell of fall leaves, crisp air…

This is the time of the reasoned response,
rather then the reaction response from the field.
When I am out in the field: I respond to the sights,
sounds, smells, direction of light, air temp,
number of other people around,
and probably a lot of things of which I am unaware.
This reaction response is expressed in terms of F/stops,
color balance, filters, and shutter speeds.
The object is to capture, as faithfully as possible,
the stimuli to which I am responding
and my mental & emotional response to it.

Is this a WOW! subject? What should it look like?
How can I say wow in a 2 dimensional image?
How do I get the wind into the photo?

Is this a “what is this doing here”?
What could I say about this?
Just how incongruous is it?
How far out of context? What does it mean to me?

Is this a “boy, is that giving a mixed message”?
How can I emphasize it?
What part of the message do I want to strengthen?

It may be some as simple as, “that’s neat”.
What is the best treatment for this?
A soft simple statement?
A bold treatment with lots of punch?

This is initial field response is
Step 1 of my photographic process.

Now, begins Step 2.
Sit down in front of my Mac,
take a deep breath,
begin.





Long Straight Road


On a field trip to the “Land Of Tall Churches”
I ran across this road scene.
It reminds me of growing up in a flat, rural
area of Ohio.
When I learned to drive it was on roads like these.
Long, flat, straight, and with almost no traffic.
Only those who lived on these roads were there.
At night, you could see for miles and miles.
On a clear night I could sometimes see the lights
of Indiana in the distance.

Of course, with roads like these, the
temptation to drive a bit fast
( mostly over 100 mph)
was just too much to resist.
As I look down this road, I can see the
tire marks from the kids that are
still driving the way we once did.

Some things never change.
The need for speed is ageless.

Some things do change.
My web site for one. I have just finished
up dating it with some new photos
and adding descriptions for all the art.
Check it out if you have a minute:
Don’t forget to sign up for my news letter
while you are there.